Basic system

Download the official Raspbian image from here and write it to a SD card of at least 8GB, following the official instruction.

Enable ssh access putting a blank file named “ssh” without extension onto boot partition. See point 3 of this guide for more details.

Put the SD card into your Raspberry Pi 3 Model B, connect it to your network using the ethernet port and power it on.

Find the IP address of your Pi and connect to it via ssh. If you are on a linux machine and your system supports avahi / zeroconf, simply open a terminal (CTRL+ALT+t) and type:

user@host:~$ ssh pi@raspberrypi.local

The default password is “raspberry”, change it to “d-diot.com”:

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ passwd

Update the OS running this three commands. This may take a while

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo apt update
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo apt dist-upgrade -y
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo apt autoremove

Add the user “pi” to the “dialout” group and verify the result.

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo usermod -a -G dialout pi
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo groupmems -g dialout -l

Create the user “homeassitant” and add them to “dialout” group (no add it to “gpio” group)

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo useradd -rm homeassistant -G dialout

Create a directory for the installation of Home Assistant and change the owner to the homeassistant account

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ cd /srv
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo mkdir homeassistant
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo chown homeassistant:homeassistant homeassistant

Reboot your Pi

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo reboot

d-diot images 1.0 and 1.1

Reconnect via ssh and install some required packages. This may take a while.

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo apt install -y minicom arduino-core arduino-mk lirc liblircclient-dev python3 python3-venv python3-pip libffi-dev mosquitto mosquitto-clients samba git net-tools nmap python-pip python-dev ipython bluetooth libbluetooth-dev python-imaging python-smbus i2c-tools mariadb-server libmariadb-dev libmariadbclient-dev shellinabox nodejs npm libudev-dev  python3-lxml python-lxml libxml2-dev libxslt-dev libopenzwave1.5-dev libopenzwave1.5 

Please note that with the previous command you have installed also shellinabox, that is a small program that allows you to have a terminal in the web browser, so an ssh client is not more needed to access your Raspberry Pi.
Simply put the following url in a web browser https://YOUR_RASPI_IP:4200, or if your network supports avahi / zeroconf, https://d-diot.local:4200

As you can see it use an encrypted connection (https), but with a self-signed certificate, so your browser may report a security issue; simply accept the certificate and proceed. In the next steps we will integrate shellinabox in the Home Assistant home page with a Panel iFrame.

d-diot image 1.2

With the kernel 4.19.X and Raspbian Buster the installation process of LIRC is a bit different, but thanks to the patch provided by the user neuralassembly (see this post) it is possible to use LIRC in the usual way.

In order to have the new dtoverlays gpio-ir and gpio-ir-tx working simoultaneously, two instances of LIRC will be created, as described here.

Reconnect via ssh and compile the patched version of LIRC from source.

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo su -c "grep '^deb ' /etc/apt/sources.list | sed 's/^deb/deb-src/g' > /etc/apt/sources.list.d/deb-src.list"
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo apt update
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo apt install devscripts

Make sure that the version of LIRC present in the official repo is not installed and install some required packages

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo apt remove lirc liblirc0 liblirc-client0
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo apt install dh-exec doxygen expect libasound2-dev libftdi1-dev libsystemd-dev libudev-dev libusb-1.0-0-dev libusb-dev man2html-base portaudio19-dev socat xsltproc python3-yaml dh-python libx11-dev python3-dev python3-setuptools

Build and compile the patched version of LIRC

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ mkdir build
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ cd build
pi@raspberrypi:~/build $ apt source lirc
pi@raspberrypi:~/build $ wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/neuralassembly/raspi/master/lirc-gpio-ir-0.10.patch
pi@raspberrypi:~/build $ patch -p0 -i lirc-gpio-ir-0.10.patch
pi@raspberrypi:~/build $ cd lirc-0.10.1
pi@raspberrypi:~/build/lirc-0.10.1 $ debuild -uc -us -b

If the building process fail, install the missing dependencies indicated by the debuild command

pi@raspberrypi:~/build/lirc-0.10.1 $ sudo apt install dh-exec dh-python doxygen expect libasound2-dev libftdi1-dev libsystemd-dev libudev-dev libusb-1.0-0-dev libusb-dev libx11-dev man2html-base portaudio19-dev python3-dev python3-setuptools socat xsltproc

Install the patched version of LIRC

pi@raspberrypi:~/build/lirc-0.10.1 $ cd ..
pi@raspberrypi:~/build $ sudo apt install ./liblirc0_0.10.1-5.2_armhf.deb ./liblircclient0_0.10.1-5.2_armhf.deb ./lirc_0.10.1-5.2_armhf.deb

The final install command will fail. The installation process will be repeated after the change of some configuration files and then it will success.

Edit the /boot/config.txt file:

pi@raspberrypi:~/build $ sudo nano /boot/config.txt

Add the following lines at the end of the file:

/boot/config.txt
dtoverlay=gpio-ir,gpio_pin=22
dtoverlay=gpio-ir-tx,gpio_pin=12

Exit (CTRL+x) and save the changes (y).

Rename the following configuration files to have a successful installation of LIRC:

pi@raspberrypi:~/build $ sudo cp /etc/lirc/lirc_options.conf.dist /etc/lirc/lirc_options.conf
pi@raspberrypi:~/build $ sudo cp /etc/lirc/lircd.conf.dist /etc/lirc/lircd.conf

Remove devinput (not used)

pi@raspberrypi:~/build $ sudo mv /etc/lirc/lircd.conf.d/devinput.lircd.conf /etc/lirc/lircd.conf.d/devinput.lircd.conf.dist

Repeat the installation command:

pi@raspberrypi:~/build $ sudo apt install ./liblirc0_0.10.1-5.2_armhf.deb ./liblircclient0_0.10.1-5.2_armhf.deb ./lirc_0.10.1-5.2_armhf.deb

Now LIRC is installed, the configuration of the two instances of the daemon is described here.

Install some required packages. This may take a while.

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo apt install -y minicom arduino-core arduino-mk python3 python3-venv python3-pip libffi-dev libssl-dev mosquitto mosquitto-clients samba git net-tools nmap python-pip python-dev ipython bluetooth libbluetooth-dev python-pil python-smbus i2c-tools mariadb-server libmariadb-dev libmariadbclient-dev shellinabox nodejs npm libudev-dev python3-lxml python-lxml libxml2-dev libxslt1-dev libopenzwave1.5-dev libopenzwave1.5   

Please note that with the previous command you have installed also shellinabox, that is a small program that allows you to have a terminal in the web browser, so an ssh client is not more needed to access your Raspberry Pi.
Simply put the following url in a web browser https://YOUR_RASPI_IP:4200, or if your network supports avahi / zeroconf, https://d-diot.local:4200

As you can see it use an encrypted connection (https), but with a self-signed certificate, so your browser may report a security issue; simply accept the certificate and proceed. In the next steps we will integrate shellinabox in the Home Assistant home page with a Panel iFrame.

Run the raspi-config tool

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo raspi-config

select the options 4 “Localisation Options” and change the following parameters according to your needs:

  • I1 Change Locale
  • I2 Change Timezone
  • I3 Change Keyboard Layout

Don't change Wifi country because it will be covered later.
Select option 2 “Network Options” and change the hostname to “d-diot”:

  • N1 Hostname

Select option 5 “Interfacing options” and then enable:

  • P4 SPI
  • P5 I2C

GPIO: d-diot images v.1.0 and v.1.1

Edit the config.txt file to set GPIO pin for MySensors radio modules (SPI), ATmega2560 serial communication (RFlink), Lirc (ir receiver and blaster), SHUTDOWN and POWEROFF functionalities.

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo nano /boot/config.txt

Add the following lines at the end of the file:

/boot/config.txt
### d.diot settings
 
# Enable serial
enable_uart=1
 
# Enable spi0 for MySensors RFM69 radio module and set the cs pins (GPIO pin 8 and 7 = PIN 24 and PIN 26)
dtoverlay=spi0-cs,cs0_pin=8,cs1_pin=7
 
# Enable spi1 for MySensors NRF24 radio module and set the cs pin (GPIO pin 16 = PIN 36)
dtoverlay=spi1-1cs,cs0_pin=16
 
# Enable shutdown pin (GPIO pin 5 = PIN 29)
dtoverlay=gpio-shutdown,gpio_pin=5,active_low=1,gpio_pull="up"
 
# Enable poweroff pin (GPIO pin 6 = PIN 31)
dtoverlay=gpio-poweroff,gpiopin=6
 
# Enable lirc-rpi and set IN and OUT pins (GPIO pin 22 and 12 = PIN 15 and PIN 32)
dtoverlay=lirc-rpi,gpio_in_pin=22,gpio_out_pin=12

Exit (CTRL+x) and save the changes (y).

GPIO: d-diot image v.1.2

Edit the config.txt file to set GPIO pin for MySensors radio modules (SPI), ATmega2560 serial communication (RFlink), Lirc (ir receiver and blaster), SHUTDOWN and POWEROFF functionalities.

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo nano /boot/config.txt

Add the following lines at the end of the file. Remember to delete the lines

dtoverlay=gpio-ir,gpio_pin=22
dtoverlay=gpio-ir-tx,gpio_pin=12

before re-addingh them in block

/boot/config.txt
### d.diot settings
 
# Enable serial
enable_uart=1
 
# Enable spi0 for MySensors RFM69 radio module and set the cs pins (GPIO pin 8 and 7 = PIN 24 and PIN 26)
dtoverlay=spi0-cs,cs0_pin=8,cs1_pin=7
 
# Enable spi1 for MySensors NRF24 radio module and set the cs pin (GPIO pin 16 = PIN 36)
dtoverlay=spi1-1cs,cs0_pin=16
 
# Enable shutdown pin (GPIO pin 5 = PIN 29)
dtoverlay=gpio-shutdown,gpio_pin=5,active_low=1,gpio_pull="up"
 
# Enable poweroff pin (GPIO pin 6 = PIN 31)
dtoverlay=gpio-poweroff,gpiopin=6
 
# Enable lirc-rpi and set IN and OUT pins (GPIO pin 22 and 12 = PIN 15 and PIN 32)
dtoverlay=gpio-ir,gpio_pin=22
dtoverlay=gpio-ir-tx,gpio_pin=12

Exit (CTRL+x) and save the changes (y).

Mount the doard

Shutdown your Pi

pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo poweroff

and mount the d-diot board. Power it on again and reconnect via ssh.
Please note that after the change of the hostname, if your system supports avahi / zeroconf, to connect to your raspberry you need to use the new name. For example if you are on a linux machine, open a terminal and then type:

user@host:~$ ssh pi@d-diot.local

To enable the serial communication with the ATmega2560 microcontroller through the pins 8 and 10 of the raspberry GPIO you need to disable the serial console. For a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B:

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo systemctl stop serial-getty@ttyS0.service
pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo systemctl disable serial-getty@ttyS0.service

You also need to remove the console from the cmdline.txt file, removing the following string: console=serial0,115200

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo nano /boot/cmdline.txt

You should see something like that:

dwc_otg.lpm_enable=0 console=serial0,115200 console=tty1 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline fsck.repair=yes root wait

that you need to modify to:

/boot/cmdline.txt
dwc_otg.lpm_enable=0 console=tty1 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rootfstype=ext4 elevator=deadline fsck.repair=yes root wait

Exit (CTRL+x) and save the changes (y).
A very good explanation on how to deal with serial ports in the Raspberry Pi is here

To use the built-in Wifi module of your Raspberry Pi as a wireless access point for your IOT devices you need to install some additional packages. A detailed guide is here.
Install dnsmasq and hostapd and then stop it

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo apt install -y dnsmasq hostapd
pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo systemctl stop dnsmasq
pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo systemctl stop hostapd

Set a static IP address for the wlan0 interface

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo nano /etc/dhcpcd.conf

Add the following lines at the end of the file:

/etc/dhcpcd.conf
interface wlan0
    static ip_address=192.168.10.1/24
    nohook wpa_supplicant

then exit (CTRL+x) and save the changes (y). Restart the dhcp client service to load the new configuration

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo systemctl daemon-reload
pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo systemctl restart dhcpcd

Configure dhcp server (dnsmasq), but first backup the original config file

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo mv /etc/dnsmasq.conf /etc/dnsmasq.conf.orig 
pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo nano /etc/dnsmasq.conf

Add the following lines to enable the dhcp server for interface wlan0 (lease time = 24h)

/etc/dnsmasq.conf
interface=wlan0     
  dhcp-range=192.168.10.2,192.168.10.100,255.255.255.0,24h

Configure the hotspot (hostapd)

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo nano /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf
/etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf
ssid=d-diot
wpa_passphrase=d-diot.com
country_code=IT
#ieee80211d=1
ieee80211n=1
interface=wlan0
driver=nl80211
hw_mode=g
channel=7
wmm_enabled=1
macaddr_acl=0
auth_algs=1
ignore_broadcast_ssid=0
wpa=2
wpa_key_mgmt=WPA-PSK
wpa_pairwise=TKIP
rsn_pairwise=CCMP

You have to set your country code “country_code=XX”, then uncomment the ieee80211d=1 line. If you wont change also the name of your wifi network “ssid=d-diot” and the passphrase “wpa_passphrase=d-diot.com”.

Set the configuration file for hostapd. Search for the line #DAEMON_CONF, and replace it with this string DAEMON_CONF=“/etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf”.

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo nano /etc/default/hostapd

click here to see the final result

click here to see the final result

/etc/default/hostapd
# Defaults for hostapd initscript
#
# See /usr/share/doc/hostapd/README.Debian for information about alternative
# methods of managing hostapd.
#
# Uncomment and set DAEMON_CONF to the absolute path of a hostapd configuration
# file and hostapd will be started during system boot. An example configuration
# file can be found at /usr/share/doc/hostapd/examples/hostapd.conf.gz
#
DAEMON_CONF="/etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf"
 
# Additional daemon options to be appended to hostapd command:-
#       -d   show more debug messages (-dd for even more)
#       -K   include key data in debug messages
#       -t   include timestamps in some debug messages
#
# Note that -B (daemon mode) and -P (pidfile) options are automatically
# configured by the init.d script and must not be added to DAEMON_OPTS.
#
# Additional daemon options to be appended to hostapd command:-
#       -d   show more debug messages (-dd for even more)
#       -K   include key data in debug messages
#       -t   include timestamps in some debug messages
#
# Note that -B (daemon mode) and -P (pidfile) options are automatically
# configured by the init.d script and must not be added to DAEMON_OPTS.
#
#DAEMON_OPTS=""

Exit (CTRL+x) and save the changes (y).

Enable dnsmasq and hostapd services

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo systemctl enable dnsmasq
pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo systemctl enable hostapd

If you get an error saying that hostapd is masked, run the following command:

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo systemctl unmask hostapd.service

To test hostapd

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo hostapd -d /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf

Start dnsmasq and hostapd

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo systemctl start dnsmasq
pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo systemctl start hostapd

Add routing

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo nano /etc/sysctl.conf

and uncomment the line 28 net.ipv4.ip_forward=1

Add a masquerade (NAT) for outbound traffic on eth0

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo iptables -t nat -A  POSTROUTING -o eth0 -j MASQUERADE

Save the iptables rule.

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo sh -c "iptables-save > /etc/iptables.ipv4.nat"

To make the NAT persistent edit the file /etc/rc.local

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo nano /etc/rc.local

and add the following line before the exit 0 string

/etc/rc.local
# Wifi AP NAT
iptables-restore < /etc/iptables.ipv4.nat

Reboot the system

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo reboot

If you wont to use the built in Wifi as a client for your network, follow this how to.

The default database engine of Home Assistant is SQLite which doesn’t require any configuration and stores all the data in a plain file located in /home/homeassistant/.homeassistant.
Home Assistant supports also different database engines and MariaDB is one of them. The adoption of a full SQL server, like MariaDB has some pros and cons and, after some thinking, it has been chosen for the d-diot project.
More information on MariaDB and Home Assistant can be found here and here.

Before using the MariaDB server is a good practice to secure the installation

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo mysql_secure_installation 

Set root password and say Y to all questions, except for change password. The root password for the database in the d-diot image is “d-diot.com”.

Test the database connection

pi@d-diot:~ $ mysql -u root -p

If you tried to login with correct credentials but it keeps saying something like this: ERROR 1698 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost'. You can disable MySQL from trying to authenticate root user using plugin:

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo mysql -u root
MariaDB [(none)]> use mysql;
MariaDB [mysql]> update user set plugin='' where User='root';
MariaDB [mysql]> flush privileges;
MariaDB [mysql]> \q

Create the database and the user for Home Assistant. As you can see the password is “d-diot.com”.

pi@d-diot:~ $ mysql -u root -p
MariaDB [(none)]> CREATE DATABASE homeassistant;
MariaDB [(none)]> CREATE USER 'homeassistant' IDENTIFIED BY 'd-diot.com';
MariaDB [(none)]> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON homeassistant.* TO 'homeassistant';
MariaDB [(none)]> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
MariaDB [(none)]> exit

Now your database server is ready to work with Home Assistant; how to configure Home Assistant to use MariaDB is covered in the next steps.

The samba server allows you to remotely access some predefined directories on the Raspberry filesystem. To configure it follow the steps below.

Create a system user “admin” and add it to samba

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo adduser --no-create-home --disabled-password --disabled-login admin
pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo smbpasswd -a admin

In the d-diot image the default samba password for the user admin is “d-diot.com” Add pi and homeassistant user to samba to allow write permission to admin

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo smbpasswd -a pi
pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo smbpasswd -a homeassistant

In the d-diot image the default samba password for the both users, pi and homeassistant, is “d-diot.com” Add the /home/pi and /home/homeassistant directories to share list

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo nano /etc/samba/smb.conf

Disable the default home shares commenting out (#) the lines 187, 188, 189, 193, 197, 201, 208 ([Home] and subsequent), then add the following lines at the end of the file. For the d-diot image v.1.2 the lines to comment out are: 169, 170, 171, 175, 179, 183, 190

[Pi]
	create mode = 755
	writeable = yes
	path = /home/pi
	force user = pi
        force group = pi
	comment = pi
	write list = admin
	directory mode = 755
	valid users = admin
[HA]
	create mode = 755
	writeable = yes
	path = /home/homeassistant
	force user = homeassistant
        force group = homeassistant
	comment = Home Assistant
	write list = admin
	directory mode = 755
	valid users = admin

Click here to see the complete smb.conf

Click here to see the complete smb.conf

/etc/samba/smb.conf
#
# Sample configuration file for the Samba suite for Debian GNU/Linux.
#
#
# This is the main Samba configuration file. You should read the
# smb.conf(5) manual page in order to understand the options listed
# here. Samba has a huge number of configurable options most of which 
# are not shown in this example
#
# Some options that are often worth tuning have been included as
# commented-out examples in this file.
#  - When such options are commented with ";", the proposed setting
#    differs from the default Samba behaviour
#  - When commented with "#", the proposed setting is the default
#    behaviour of Samba but the option is considered important
#    enough to be mentioned here
#
# NOTE: Whenever you modify this file you should run the command
# "testparm" to check that you have not made any basic syntactic 
# errors. 
 
#======================= Global Settings =======================
 
[global]
 
## Browsing/Identification ###
 
# Change this to the workgroup/NT-domain name your Samba server will part of
   workgroup = WORKGROUP
 
# Windows Internet Name Serving Support Section:
# WINS Support - Tells the NMBD component of Samba to enable its WINS Server
#   wins support = no
 
# WINS Server - Tells the NMBD components of Samba to be a WINS Client
# Note: Samba can be either a WINS Server, or a WINS Client, but NOT both
;   wins server = w.x.y.z
 
# This will prevent nmbd to search for NetBIOS names through DNS.
   dns proxy = no
 
#### Networking ####
 
# The specific set of interfaces / networks to bind to
# This can be either the interface name or an IP address/netmask;
# interface names are normally preferred
;   interfaces = 127.0.0.0/8 eth0
 
# Only bind to the named interfaces and/or networks; you must use the
# 'interfaces' option above to use this.
# It is recommended that you enable this feature if your Samba machine is
# not protected by a firewall or is a firewall itself.  However, this
# option cannot handle dynamic or non-broadcast interfaces correctly.
;   bind interfaces only = yes
 
 
 
#### Debugging/Accounting ####
 
# This tells Samba to use a separate log file for each machine
# that connects
   log file = /var/log/samba/log.%m
 
# Cap the size of the individual log files (in KiB).
   max log size = 1000
 
# If you want Samba to only log through syslog then set the following
# parameter to 'yes'.
#   syslog only = no
 
# We want Samba to log a minimum amount of information to syslog. Everything
# should go to /var/log/samba/log.{smbd,nmbd} instead. If you want to log
# through syslog you should set the following parameter to something higher.
   syslog = 0
 
# Do something sensible when Samba crashes: mail the admin a backtrace
   panic action = /usr/share/samba/panic-action %d
 
 
####### Authentication #######
 
# Server role. Defines in which mode Samba will operate. Possible
# values are "standalone server", "member server", "classic primary
# domain controller", "classic backup domain controller", "active
# directory domain controller". 
#
# Most people will want "standalone sever" or "member server".
# Running as "active directory domain controller" will require first
# running "samba-tool domain provision" to wipe databases and create a
# new domain.
   server role = standalone server
 
# If you are using encrypted passwords, Samba will need to know what
# password database type you are using.  
   passdb backend = tdbsam
 
   obey pam restrictions = yes
 
# This boolean parameter controls whether Samba attempts to sync the Unix
# password with the SMB password when the encrypted SMB password in the
# passdb is changed.
   unix password sync = yes
 
# For Unix password sync to work on a Debian GNU/Linux system, the following
# parameters must be set (thanks to Ian Kahan <<kahan@informatik.tu-muenchen.de> for
# sending the correct chat script for the passwd program in Debian Sarge).
   passwd program = /usr/bin/passwd %u
   passwd chat = *Enter\snew\s*\spassword:* %n\n *Retype\snew\s*\spassword:* %n\n *password\supdated\ssuccessfully* .
 
# This boolean controls whether PAM will be used for password changes
# when requested by an SMB client instead of the program listed in
# 'passwd program'. The default is 'no'.
   pam password change = yes
 
# This option controls how unsuccessful authentication attempts are mapped
# to anonymous connections
   map to guest = bad user
 
########## Domains ###########
 
#
# The following settings only takes effect if 'server role = primary
# classic domain controller', 'server role = backup domain controller'
# or 'domain logons' is set 
#
 
# It specifies the location of the user's
# profile directory from the client point of view) The following
# required a [profiles] share to be setup on the samba server (see
# below)
;   logon path = \\%N\profiles\%U
# Another common choice is storing the profile in the user's home directory
# (this is Samba's default)
#   logon path = \\%N\%U\profile
 
# The following setting only takes effect if 'domain logons' is set
# It specifies the location of a user's home directory (from the client
# point of view)
;   logon drive = H:
#   logon home = \\%N\%U
 
# The following setting only takes effect if 'domain logons' is set
# It specifies the script to run during logon. The script must be stored
# in the [netlogon] share
# NOTE: Must be store in 'DOS' file format convention
;   logon script = logon.cmd
 
# This allows Unix users to be created on the domain controller via the SAMR
# RPC pipe.  The example command creates a user account with a disabled Unix
# password; please adapt to your needs
; add user script = /usr/sbin/adduser --quiet --disabled-password --gecos "" %u
 
# This allows machine accounts to be created on the domain controller via the 
# SAMR RPC pipe.  
# The following assumes a "machines" group exists on the system
; add machine script  = /usr/sbin/useradd -g machines -c "%u machine account" -d /var/lib/samba -s /bin/false %u
 
# This allows Unix groups to be created on the domain controller via the SAMR
# RPC pipe.  
; add group script = /usr/sbin/addgroup --force-badname %g
 
############ Misc ############
 
# Using the following line enables you to customise your configuration
# on a per machine basis. The %m gets replaced with the netbios name
# of the machine that is connecting
;   include = /home/samba/etc/smb.conf.%m
 
# Some defaults for winbind (make sure you're not using the ranges
# for something else.)
;   idmap uid = 10000-20000
;   idmap gid = 10000-20000
;   template shell = /bin/bash
 
# Setup usershare options to enable non-root users to share folders
# with the net usershare command.
 
# Maximum number of usershare. 0 (default) means that usershare is disabled.
;   usershare max shares = 100
 
# Allow users who've been granted usershare privileges to create
# public shares, not just authenticated ones
   usershare allow guests = yes
 
#======================= Share Definitions =======================
 
#[homes]
   comment = Home Directories
#   browseable = no
 
# By default, the home directories are exported read-only. Change the
# next parameter to 'no' if you want to be able to write to them.
#   read only = yes
 
# File creation mask is set to 0700 for security reasons. If you want to
# create files with group=rw permissions, set next parameter to 0775.
#   create mask = 0700
 
# Directory creation mask is set to 0700 for security reasons. If you want to
# create dirs. with group=rw permissions, set next parameter to 0775.
   directory mask = 0700
 
# By default, \\server\username shares can be connected to by anyone
# with access to the samba server.
# The following parameter makes sure that only "username" can connect
# to \\server\username
# This might need tweaking when using external authentication schemes
#   valid users = %S
 
# Un-comment the following and create the netlogon directory for Domain Logons
# (you need to configure Samba to act as a domain controller too.)
;[netlogon]
;   comment = Network Logon Service
;   path = /home/samba/netlogon
;   guest ok = yes
;   read only = yes
 
# Un-comment the following and create the profiles directory to store
# users profiles (see the "logon path" option above)
# (you need to configure Samba to act as a domain controller too.)
# The path below should be writable by all users so that their
# profile directory may be created the first time they log on
;[profiles]
;   comment = Users profiles
;   path = /home/samba/profiles
;   guest ok = no
;   browseable = no
;   create mask = 0600
;   directory mask = 0700
 
[printers]
   comment = All Printers
   browseable = no
   path = /var/spool/samba
   printable = yes
   guest ok = no
   read only = yes
   create mask = 0700
 
# Windows clients look for this share name as a source of downloadable
# printer drivers
[print$]
   comment = Printer Drivers
   path = /var/lib/samba/printers
   browseable = yes
   read only = yes
   guest ok = no
# Uncomment to allow remote administration of Windows print drivers.
# You may need to replace 'lpadmin' with the name of the group your
# admin users are members of.
# Please note that you also need to set appropriate Unix permissions
# to the drivers directory for these users to have write rights in it
;   write list = root, @lpadmin
 
[Pi]
	create mode = 755
	writeable = yes
	path = /home/pi
	force user = pi
        force group = pi
	comment = pi
	write list = admin
	directory mode = 755
	valid users = admin
 
[HA]
	create mode = 755
	writeable = yes
	path = /home/homeassistant
	force user = homeassistant
        force group = homeassistant
	comment = Home Assistant
	write list = admin
	directory mode = 755
	valid users = admin

Save, exit and restart samba server.

pi@d-diot:~ $ sudo systemctl restart smbd

  • system_administration/manual_installation/1_basic_system.txt
  • Last modified: 2019/10/20 09:01
  • by franzunix